Tea Lallukka, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health - The contributions of mental health, sleep and pain to work participation: a special focus on person-oriented methods and within-individual analysis

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Title:  The contributions of mental health, sleep and pain to work participation: a special focus on person-oriented methods and within-individual analysis

Abstract:  In her talk, Tea will summarize results from several of her projects focused on life course social epidemiology. She will show examples of both ongoing and published studied addressing mental health, sleep, and pain, and subsequent work participation trajectories as indicated mainly by sickness absence and disability retirement. The studies have been done using repeated survey data, as well as linking survey data with administrative records. The data are from Finland, Sweden and UK, and there is an ongoing study using the HILDA data as well. The results highlight person-oriented methods such as group-based trajectory modelling and repeated measure latent class analysis. She will also share novel results from a recent study utilising a within individual approach, where it was possible to control for bias due to unobservable time-invariant characteristics. Such an approach had not been previously applied in studies on pain and work participation.

Presenter: Tea Lallukka, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health

Bio: Tea Lallukka, (PhD, Adjunct professor), Academy Research Fellow is a senior researcher at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and University of Helsinki, Finland. She is also an affiliate at the University of Sydney, Australia, and is an associate at the Karolinska Institute, Sweden. Currently, she is a visiting professor at the Woolcock Institute of Medical Research. She has over 200 scientific publications, of which 160 are peer-reviewed international articles. Most of her studies have been done using occupational cohort data, addressing e.g. socioeconomic inequalities in mental and physical health, as well as sickness absence and disability retirement.

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